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Filmism.net Dispatch August 18, 2008

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Valé Bernie Mac, who really impressed in some distinctive roles – even in some unimpressive movies – like the car salesman in Transformers and one of the Ocean's Eleven crew, and who passed away very prematurely.

The US release of Tropic Thunder was marred by protesters from some disability support group, and it got me thinking about The Da Vinci Code, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, and a million other movies that, if they'd have come out in the 70 or 80s, would have been just movies.

But it's the noughties now and everything's a political statement. Apparently there's a line of dialogue in the film that's disrespectful to the disabled, and in today's world there's always an interest group ready to complain about the content of a high profile film.

Why has it come to this? Aha, you thought I was going to go off on a rant against political correctness, but I don't think these organisations and lobby groups care a hoot what big stars say in Hollywood movies. I think they have savvy 21st century marketing advisors who know that roping your horse to the bandwagon of a big Hollywood movie will get you lots of high profile mentions in the media, with lots of right wing commentators ranting about the end of decency and thus doing your expensive marketing for you for free. As the sage said, celebrity is the new currency (and I'm the sage).

There's apparently going to be a new Conan thanks to the property falling into the hands of new producers (a la The Terminator series), and they could do a really good remake of that one.

And in some bizarre casting in Quentin Tarantino's long-gestating World War II film Inglourious Basterds, none other than Mike Shrek Myers is playing a British officer. Can't you hear it now? (In broad Scottish brogue) 'You and what army?'

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